Dialog Box

What is MND

Motor neurone disease (MND) affects the nerves (motor neurones) that communicate between the brain and the muscles that enable us to move, speak, swallow and breathe. MND Is known as Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) in other parts of the world.

Motor neurones carry the messages from the brain to the muscles via the spinal cord. These messages allow people to make voluntary movements like walking, swallowing, talking and breathing. In people with MND, the motor neurones gradually degenerate and die, causing the muscles to weaken and waste. 

There is currently no known cure for MND. 

MND is a life-limiting disease, with the majority of cases being no known cause. However about 5-10% or cases are familial (inherited) with the genetic fault of about 60% of cases in Australia families. Research is still investigating sporadic cases and genetics.

MND progresses differently for each person with the average life expectancy being 2.5 years, however 5-10% can survive beyond 10 years.

The lifetime risk of developing MND is about 1 in 300 by the age of 85, with the risk increasing steadily as people get older.

There are currently more men than women are diagnosed with MND, and most commonly between the ages of 50 to 60 years. MND may be diagnosed in adults at any age.

On average every day in Australia, two people are diagnosed with MND and two will die from the disease. There are currently over 2,100 Australians living with MND.


Motor neurones carry the messages from the brain to the muscles via the spinal cord. These messages allow people to make voluntary movements like walking, swallowing, talking and breathing. In people with MND, the Motor Neurones gradually degenerate and die, causing the muscles to weaken and waste. There is currently no known cure for MND. MND is a life-limiting disease, with the majority of cases being no known cause.

Donate